Things to consider before choosing an Oscilloscope

Introduction
An oscilloscope is an electronic instrument that is used to represent the voltage of an electronic device. It signifies one or more electric potential differences in a clear two-dimensional graph, with the horizontal axis representing time and the vertical axis showing voltage. It is used to diagnose the working condition of any electric equipment.

Oscilloscope

Tips to choosing the best Oscilloscope

Sample Rate
Sample rate is usually specified in Megasamples per second (MS/s) or Gigasamples per second (GS/s). The Nyquist criterion states that the sampling rate must be at least twice the maximum frequency that you want to measure in order to display a particular frequency. But for a scope you really require at least 5 samples to accurately reconstruct a waveform.

Bandwidth
What sort of signals do you want to display? For instance, a microprocessor system clock may be the highest frequency signal the scope you will want to display. So your oscilloscope should have a bandwidth of 3 – 4 times greater than this clock frequency, in order to display the waveform adequately. If, however, you want to accurately see the rise-time of the clock, you’ll need around 10 times that frequency as a sample rate.
Bandwidth is arguably the single most important property of an oscilloscope, determining the range of signals that can be displayed. It also dictates price range, since it is much harder and more expensive to make really fast scope circuitry.

Resolution and Accuracy
In digital electronics, measuring a signal change of 1% is usually ok, but in audio electronics, 0.1% distortion or noise can be a showstopper. Most modern DSOs are optimized for use with fast digital signals and only offer 8 bit resolution (8 bit ADC), so can detect about a 0.4% signal change. With 8 bit resolution, the voltage range is divided up into 256 vertical steps. With a ±1 V range selected, this corresponds to around 8mV per step. This may be adequate for viewing digital signals but may be inadequate for viewing analog signals, especially when using a built-in FFT spectrum analyzer function. For applications such as audio, noise, vibration and monitoring sensors (temperature, current, pressure) an 8 bit oscilloscope is often not suitable and you should consider 12 or 16 bit alternatives. Most bench scopes are 8-bit devices, however.

Waveform Update Rate
An oscilloscope’s update rate is its ability to make repetitive measurements with minimal dead intervals between samples. A fast update rate makes the display more responsive to rapidly-changing signals. A major factor in the quality of an oscilloscope display is its update rate. Faster update rates improve the probability that infrequent events, such as glitches, are captured.

Ease of Use
Some scopes offer “one-touch” automatic setup, or a number of memorized set-up configurations, increasing a scope’s ease of use. Others include a built-in help system to save you constantly referring to the manual. Some scopes dispense with dedicated, user-friendly rotary knobs, and replace them with cheaper buttons for often-used adjustments such as vertical sensitivity, time-base speed, trace position, and trigger level.

Waveform Update Rate
An oscilloscope’s update rate is its ability to make repetitive measurements with minimal dead intervals between samples. A fast update rate makes the display more responsive to rapidly-changing signals. A major factor in the quality of an oscilloscope display is its update rate. Faster update rates improve the probability that infrequent events, such as glitches, are captured.

Conclusion
I hope you will find the above tips relevant for choosing the right Oscilloscope. To purchase quality and top-notch Oscilloscopes visit Banggood.com

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